New Criminal Justice Debt Fund Will Fight Poverty

The Chapel Hill Town Council passed a resolution introduced by Council members Karen Stegman and Allen Buansi creating a pilot program to cover court costs and fees for people unable to afford them. Failure to pay court costs such as traffic and parking violations disproportionately harm low-income people when penalties, including suspended driver’s licenses, and user fees lead to lost jobs, evictions from homes and other hardships. Read more here.


Buansi Speaks on the First Day of the Trial - Common Cause v. Lewis

"When you go into the voting booth, you expect to be able to access the ballot unfettered, without discrimination. So why can't that same basic principle apply to our districts?"

https://www.facebook.com/CommonCauseNorthCarolina/videos/411225766152073/


Chapel Hill Honors Chef and Restaurant owner Mama Dip and Civil Rights Leader Harold Foster

On June 5, at the Peace and Justice Plaza, the Town of Chapel Hill honored two heroes, Mildred "Mama Dip" Council and Harold Foster. Mama Dip was the restaurant owner of Mama Dip's, an iconic restaurant that serves traditional southern cuisine and soul food. Her restaurant gained worldwide fame, and her work drew the attention Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. She also was fiercely committed to creating opportunities for work and meals in our community. Harold Foster demonstrated leadership and a commitment to equality at a young age. He organized nine African American teenagers to conduct Chapel Hill's first sit-in at the old Colonial Drug Store on Franklin Street, making history. He was one of the preeminent leaders of the Chapel Hill Freedom movement in the 1960s. Read more here.


Buansi Joins Board of Common Cause of North Carolina

The State Advisory Board for Common Cause of North Carolina appointed Buansi in May. Read the press release here.


Chapel Hill Marks 50th Anniversary of Election of its First Black Mayor, Howard Lee

WUNC reports on the commemoration by the Town of Chapel Hill of the 50th anniversary of the day its first and only African American mayor was elected in 1969 - Howard Lee.